The Müngsten Bridge – World Heritage?

A superlative for 120 years, the famed German railway bridge is slated for potential World Heritage status

Like a rainbow made of steel, the Müngsten bridge traces an arc over the valley between Solingen- Schaberg and Remscheid- Güldenwerth. Diagonal, vertical and horizontal steel parts form a structure both gigantic and delicate. The Müngsten bridge is often called a structure that has written technological history and which became internationally important as an icon of the industrial era. In any case the Müngsten bridge is one of the very few large bridges in Germany which have mostly remained in their original state. This is one of the reasons why today’s owner, the DB Netz AG, has decided on further investments of 50 million Euro in order to preserve this unique structure.

The Müngsten bridge, which was named an historical landmark in 1985, is gaining universal importance in combination with four more bridges which have been built at almost the same time in Italy, France and Portugal. In close cooperation with the municipalities of the “sister” bridges Solingen, Remscheid and Wuppertal are working on a joint application for the sought-after UNESCO title.

Already in 2012, the Müngsten bridge was classified as a “Landmark of national importance”. Now all five of them start out together under the umbrella of a “serial trans-national application” – together with the bridges Ponte Maria Pia and Ponte Dom Luis I. in Portugal, the Garabit Viaduct in France and the Ponte San Michele in Italy.

TODAY’S OWNER, THE DB NETZ AG, HAS DECIDED ON FURTHER INVESTMENTS OF 50 MILLION EURO IN ORDER TO PRESERVE THIS UNIQUE STRUCTURE

During a convention in November 2017 attended by the representatives of the communities of Porto (Portugal), Ruyes en Margaride (France) and Paderno d’Adda and Calusco d’Adda (Italy) Solingen’s mayor Tim Kurzbach, vigorously said: “It took valour to finish this structure back then, and it takes a pioneering spirit from all of us today to reach our common goal. However, this first meeting and our talks have been very encouraging. We all look upon ourselves as bridge builders”